Chadwick Boseman and the never-before-seen interview with ’s Kelley Carter —

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Years of taking on roles as legendary Black changemakers such as Jackie Robinson, James Brown and Thurgood Marshall only touch the surface of the mark Chadwick Boseman left on Hollywood.

The performances hold even more meaning after Boseman’s death in August 2020 from colon cancer. Since 2013, ’s entertainment reporter Kelley Carter has covered Boseman and his journey. At times, he got personal about his experience and one of those moments was in an exclusive, never-before-seen interview with Carter in 2018.

During NBA All-Star Weekend, Boseman talked with Carter after the January 2018 release of the groundbreaking film Black Panther, sharing thoughts about his career, the pivotal moments, Black and African pride and more. In the 16-minute interview, Boseman talked about how becoming a real-life superhero fulfilled his childhood desires for superpowers and what that means to young children who look up to him.

“As a kid you grew up playing superheroes,” he said. “Even like, for me, I would steal different parts because I wanted all the powers I could get. I would try to have Spider-Man’s webs, Superman’s strength, Wonder Woman’s bracelets. Like, I wanted everything. So to be that for somebody and know it’s what it makes them feel, like, first of all their imagination and they’re creating a whole different world within their minds. And then also you don’t realize it until you get older, but you can draw on that, that feeling of invincibility in real moments and use it.”

Boseman’s talent continues to be celebrated, but now it’s as an Oscar nominee. His last film, Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom, was released on Netflix in November and earned critical acclaim, landing him a posthumous best actor nomination. He plays Levee, a talented and complicated trumpeter, co-starring with A-list actors Viola Davis, Colman Domingo and Glynn Turman.

Chadwick Boseman portrayed trumpeter Levee in Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom, his final film.

David Lee/NETFLIX

Posthumous award nominees date to 1940 and with a win, Boseman would become the third actor to receive a posthumous Oscar and the first African American to do so.

Although his career was cut short, Boseman continues lending memories to fans who continue to adore his craft, his life and his legacy.

Kelley Evans is a general editor at . She is a food passionista, helicopter mom and an unapologetic southerner who spends every night with the cast of The Young and the Restless by way of her couch.



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